Tag Archives: leadership coaching

Leadership

We’re off to see the Wizard

Leadership“A more collegial style of leadership is too often characterised as a weakness.”

 

 

This was a quote from Archie Brown, author of ‘The Myth of the Strong Leader’, reported in the Guardian newspaper last week, because it’s a book on Bill Gates’s reading list.

Bob Hughes and I interviewed the author a while back – you can listen to it here, and read the book review too.

What struck me at the time was how we get seduced by charismatic leaders.  The celebrities; the sportspeople; the men and women in positions of authority.

All of these people can be leaders; absolutely.  The potential is there.  But there’s a difference between falling for the charisma and really displaying leadership qualities and behaviours.

Over the years we’ve interviewed people who’ve climbed Everest, coached top sportspeople and sailed around the world.  The key difference we’ve noticed is between those who focus on their own achievements – great as they are – and the power of being one of the team.

Tracey Edwards MBE, for example, told us that her role of Captain in the Whitbread Round-the-world race in the first women-only crew – was ‘accidental’.  There were far more experienced people in the crew than her.  She is, of course, being modest.  Her engaging leadership style and the way she respects the technical abilities of her crew are second to none.

Tracey is a great motivational speaker too.  But that’s often the only thing some celebrities have going for them – the ability to look and sound good.

Today we live in the ‘plasticine’ era – we’ve all got feet of clay.  And the media are happy to expose our shortcomings.  Especially when we stand up for something, and raise our heads above the media parapet.

As leaders we can be flexible in our approaches, but our values and authenticity need to shine through.

But don’t mistake this collegiate approach with weak leadership.  Whether it’s a more collegial, a more coach-like, or more inclusive approach to leadership, engaging leadership draws on the power of the whole team – not one individual.

And it’s why a systematic approach to leadership development matters.  Building leadership on a foundation of consistently-observed behaviours that evoke high performance in the people around us is essential.

Leadership qualities build on our emotional intelligence too.  Which is why the Forton leadership programme combines emotionally-intelligent leadership styles and competencies, along with the high-performing behaviours.

So whether you need to develop your technical leaders to be more engaging, your sales-force to be more effective, or your managers to get their best out of your people –  and you want tangibly better leadership – get in touch. You’ll find us at +44 (0) 345 077 2980 option 1, or email info@thefortongroup.com.

Leadership is the answer

The answer is leadership development – now what’s the question?

It’s often said that there’s no one way to deliver leadership development – and our clients are certainly prime examples of that diversity.

Leadership is the answer

  • We write ‘how-to’ guides for annual review and performance conversations – where clients want scripted solutions.
  • We teach flexible ‘manager as coach’ skills where situations are more fluid and less predictable.
  • We deliver ‘Level 7 PGCertificates in leadership’ where our clients want a mixture of skills and strategic thinking.

The one constant, however, is the need to equip leaders with the behaviours and skills to deal with what’s in front of them – today.

Without breaking the bank, losing half your staff to the latest management fad, or your top talent to competitors with deeper pockets.

The world is changing fast.  I refuse to use the ‘B’ word.  But I can guarantee it affects us all.

Better, more tangible leadership will steady the ship because it impacts on all aspects of your operations – individuals, teams, departments, the organisation as a whole – and its impact on the community and society around you.

And there’s a vital shift of attitudes that underpin successful leadership development programmes away from

  • Blaming others to personal responsibility
  • Waiting for someone else to rubber stamp solutions towards taking initiative
  • Latest fads to evidence-based leadership behaviours, consistently applied.

Recently from some very busy managers told me how committed they are to applying their skills.  Despite the challenges, everyone who reported applying the skills also reported benefits: ‘a really positive experience’; ‘it really motivated and inspired me’.

It’s great when managers feel that they have invested their time well.  Such that, even when they feel time pressures, they apply their learning.

What most struck me was how managers noticed that they can become enablers.  They simply support others to solve their own problems and feel better able to sort out their own issues themselves.

This sense of personal responsibility isn’t innate in everyone.  The good news is that, like every other leadership behaviour, it can be learned and applied.

Another client reported that, in every department where our programmes have been introduced, productivity has improved; employee engagement has risen and employee costs (sickness, absenteeism, legal) have fallen.

So if your job is to improve the performance of your people and teams – whatever the challenge – start with leadership.

And if you want tangibly better leadership, get in touch. 

You’ll find us at +44 (0) 345 077 2980 option 1, or email info@thefortongroup.com.

Leadership Development – Silver Bullets Only Kill Werewolves

It’s human nature to want to keep our relationships simple.  Yet it’s a key leadership task to keep on top of the complex interplay of different relationships.  Put simply: our team members, colleagues, bosses and the wider stakeholder network.  It’s no wonder people find it difficult.

And of course, all this focus on others means that we neglect our own needs in this complex mix.

One solution is to analyse these groups and assess them by their power, influence or interest in your work.  A neat process, but one which doesn’t take human factors into account.

And it’s often in those that things can go horribly wrong.  Misunderstandings, lack of acknowledgement or recognition for good work, resentment of others.

Here at Forton, we regularly get asked to design workshops and programmes that help leaders and managers with ‘problem staff’: those ‘difficult conversations’, performance management; or customer relationships.

People typically ask us something like “What can I say when….?”

At the heart of these requests is the desire to have a single solution; a silver bullet.  But silver bullets only kill werewolves; sorting out relationships requires a more human approach.

Too often, when we go into organisations with these kinds of issues, we find that the basics for better relationships – at all levels – aren’t in place.

Here are three steps that you can put into place and share today:

Step 1: Make sure managers are putting their own needs first, so that they’re better able to deal with others’ needs too.

An insurance client told us a fascinating statistic recently: dentists who work fewer days each week earn more money.  This is because they have better relationships with their patients; plus they make better clinical and business decisions too.

If that’s what we need from our leaders and managers, investing in smarter working – not longer hours – is the easiest and first solution.

Step 2: Ensure that managers and leaders know about the need to give regular acknowledgements of their team’s good work. 

People need a higher ratio of praise to criticism than managers typically think.  The Gottman Ratio is 6:1 for organisations (5:1 for personal relationships if you want to improve that area of your life).

Step 3: When it’s criticism that’s required, use a consistent feedback model that works – both for the giver, and the receiver of feedback. 

The best way to give (and receive) feedback is to make it future-focused around what success looks like.  Most people look backwards and focus on what went wrong and who’s to blame.

The other step you can take, is to give your leaders and managers some perspective – and distance from the day-to-day – by investing in a leadership development workshop.

At Forton we change cultures and support leadership development through bite-sized, half-day and week-long events.

Whichever behavioural framework you use in your organisation, our programmes will align with your goals.  And if you need to demonstrate return on investment (ROI) evidence, we can show you how.

To experience lasting performance improvements in your organisation, try us out.  Attend our next open leadership Ignite event – on 5/6 December in the heart of England. 

Or bring this workshop in-house with 6 people or more.

Pick up the phone at +44 (0) 845 077 2980 option 1, or email info@thefortongroup.com.

 

Coach training for experienced coaches: the Forton difference

If, like me, you’re an experienced coach working with executives and leaders in corporate settings, you may be wondering why you need to invest in specific leadership coaching training. Of course, you may be about to renew your credentials, which is a great reason to do this!

Here at The Forton Group, we provide a wide range of flexible ways of getting the CCEUs and supervision hours you require for ICF renewal.

But what’s different about leadership coaching, why should you add it to your kitbag and why The Forton Group? Continue reading